Friday after Ash Wednesday February 16, 2018

Then God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. Genesis 1:3

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With those glorious words, “Let there be light,” God bestows his gift of sight to creation.

It is not insignificant that Holy Scripture’s chapter verse 1:3 numbering designation announces the creation of light; the very same numbers used to express the Holy Trinity: One God in Three Divine Persons.  Let there be light, at its very core, is about making God known by sight; naturally through the created world, and spiritually through faith.  Let God be known is the meaning of Let there be light.  St. John of the Cross, the Church’s master of spiritual light theology, refers to God as, “Who is light.” 1

Darkness covers information, light reveals the information darkness covers; this goes for both spiritual and natural light. Sin and disordered desires foster spiritual darkness leading to spiritual blindness. The broadest definition of “information” is “what is conveyed or represented by a particular arrangement or sequence of things.” The definition of “sight,” or “visual perception,” is the “ability to interpret the surrounding environment by processing information contained in the visible light.” There is information, more commonly called knowledge, contained in spiritual light which also requires spiritual sight to interpret. God is the author of all good information in both natural and spiritual light. Both kinds of light, natural light indirectly through the beauty of creation and spiritual light directly and obscurely to individual souls, are God’s way of making himself known.

Individuals can have varying abilities to interpret information contained in both kinds of light. Those who are near-sighted or far-sighted have less ability interpreting the same information contained in natural light as those with 20/20 vision. Sensitive, injured eyes can’t stand much natural light; a soul weakened by sin can’t withstand as much spiritual light as one whose spiritual life has matured. Sin, St. John says, blinds the soul. 2Disordered affections and desires cause what St. John calls spiritual cataracts and clouds that cover the eye of reason, so that the soul cannot see what is right in front of them.3 Believing that which is intrinsically evil to be acceptable is an example of this type of blindness. Christians viewing abortion as acceptable fall under this spiritual blindness St. John describes.

In Reading 1 for the first Friday of Lent, God declares man’s sacrifices done by works of mercy produce for him light, healing, liberation, God’s glory and help. Jesus’ sacrifice accomplished the same for all who wish to partake of it.

USCCB Readings February 16th, 2018

Footnotes

  1.  F3,62; St. John is speaking spiritually, God is not the created light.
  2. F3,61
  3. F3,63

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Julie

I am a devout Roman Catholic living in the desert southwest.

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